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Saturday, July 27, 2013

Crimson clover - a crop I recommend.


This youtube clip looks at the use of crimson clover on drought-prone farms and is a good watch, if only to hear the farmer's voice. I grow crimson clover here and find it delightful. It also makes an excellent cut-flower. Crimson clover would be an ideal roadside plant, in my opinion, and would bolster the store of available nectar for honey bees. The clip describes the value of protecting soil from the elements and the clover does this very well. The farmer talks too, about managing the crop so that it self-seeds, meaning your one initial investment (crimson clover is quite cheep and you get a LOT of seed for your money) is a long-term one, rather than a one-off.








4 comments:

wildcrafty said...

That's a great video, very informative. Do you know if there is much difference between red clover and crimson clover in terms of using it for a cover crop? Where are you using it? Vege garden and then dug in? Would it work as a chop and drop cover crop for planting perennials?

robertguyton said...

Crimson is annual, red is perennial. Chop and drop is the preferred method, as it leaves the nodules in the soil (clover's a legume). If you can get it established, you will be very happy that you did. It's a charming plant with a gorgeous flower. bees love it. It happily grows amongst other plants.

renetsil said...

Thanks Robert...I was always a bit sceptical about actually sowing clover in my garden but, if you say it's an annual, I will do it !!!

robertguyton said...

Excellent - you won't regret it in any way.