Site Meter

Sunday, January 3, 2016

10 shillings


That's not a lot to pay for a bucket that's lasted over 30 years!

5 comments:

Philip Todd said...

Lucky you didn't buy two or you would have to chuck the other one out.
Can still vividly remember the day decimal currency arrived. We went to the shop for some lollies but when we got the change in cents couldn't work out what else we could buy. All those hours at school learning about shillings and pounds and even the Guinea which spell check cant even spell today.

robertguyton said...

I too remember the day 10c pieces appeared - my Dad gave me one to take home to show the family, but I went straight to the shop and spent it on sodee pop or some such sugar. What a rotter I was! I was ... 10 years old? The tenth of July, what year??
Were you a "Dollar Scholar", Philip?
Squirriling-away those cents...

Philip Todd said...

1967. Was my first year at OBHS. Used to catch the Railcar at 7.20am and get home at 5.30pm. Was a relief to get a job so I could do shorter hours haha. So right up to Standard 6 was done in the dozens. The day it changed must have been a Saturday as we were not at school. A lot of the coins stayed the same apart from the 1 and 2 cents. Sixpence become 5 cents, a shilling become 10 cents and a florin become 20 cents. The half crown disappeared I think. You will remember the old Bob a Job scout fundraising?
Used to walk past a retired baker called Doughy Holland who loved leaning on his front fence and imparting his pearls of wisdom. The only one I remember was " Once you save you first $1,000 the rest become easy. Took me a few years and inflation pushed the goal posts a bit by then. Could buy a packet of Capstan 20,s for 22cents and a dozen big bottle of Speights for $3.20. Cant remember the price of petrol but do remember a few years later when it hit $1 a gallon and everyone thought the world was about to grind to a stop. Grand daughter turned 12 weeks yesterday and cant help think what will she experience in her life.
We certainly have lived through an interesting and varied time, lucky not to have been part of the war years and the immediate aftermath, a time when the unemployed were all known to the PM by their first names and the huge events like landing on the moon.
The next generation will have the job of putting the things we wreck in our quest for the almighty dollar.

robertguyton said...

"Capstan Cork" was my mother's poison. Nearly killed her. Killed my dad :-)
I have Bob-a-job memories, the oddest being calling upon an elderly woman who suffered a huge goitre. She was a sweetie and gave us our bob for doing very little. Also called in on the local dentist's home and was stunned to see wealth for the first time - they had a pool! In my little village! And a tennis court. I was stunned.

robertguyton said...

Twice over.